Appendices - Self-organized Learning

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RESUME

CAPSTONE

PHILOSOPHY

LEADERSHIP


SELF-
ASSESSMENT

Start of Journey

Chaos Begins

Goodbye Technology

Emergence

Clarity

INTERNSHIP REFLECTION

APPENDICES

Learning Theories

Needs Assessment

Instructional Design

Assessment

Self-Organized Learning

MAIN PAGE

Masters of Education Portfolio of John Inman

Reflection

Note: If you would like to review my needs assessment project before reading my reflection, please go to the bottom of the page.

Self-Organized Learning was an extraordinary course, and it provided me with an introduction to the core of my work in conversational learning as a foundation for self-organization. The chaos created in the self-organized learning course was exciting and demanding. As I read more and more material from my research and that of others, living systems and self-organization became a guiding map for my journey toward the education leader I envision becoming. And even more importantly, I became convinced that conversation is the process that makes a living human system possible. What made this particularly exciting was my passion for conversation as a process to create learning. In fact, I  envision pursuing my doctorate based on conversational learning. 

As my research continued, more and more work began to support conversation as the foundation for self-organized learning in a living human system. During my course work in leadership in which I focused on leading in a living system, I found and purchased the newly published book Conversational Learning by Ann Baker, Patricia Jensen, and David Kolb. Conversational Learning is an extraordinary resource for the foundation of my work in conversation. The book was published after our self-organization course; however, the book could not have come into my research at a more important time. The well referenced text provides me with the foundation, background, and direction that will support my development as a leader in the field of adult education.

To Dance Together is a paper that helped me build my vision of leading in a living system. What does it take? Was it different than leading within a non-living systems context? I have taken the original paper and have further expanded it to include my newest research. After my recent research, it became painfully clear that the original paper that I wrote, however well intentioned, was far below the quality level that I now demand of my work. The rewrite has been extensive, and I hope to publish this paper as it is further developed. 

To Dance Together

Copyright © John Inman January 1, 2003